Low-cost tissue-freezing device could expand access to lifesaving breast cancer treatments

Home Blog Low-cost tissue-freezing device could expand access to lifesaving breast cancer treatments

A reusable breast cancer treatment device created by a group of students at Johns Hopkins University offers a low-cost alternative for women in low-income and low-resource countries. The new device is a tissue-freezing probe that uses cryoablation, a method that kills cancerous tissue by exposing it to extremely cold temperatures, and employs carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable alternative to argon, the current industry standard.


While the survival rate for women with breast cancer in the United States is greater than 90%, it is the largest cause of cancer-related mortality for women across the globe and disproportionately affects women in lower-income countries, where treatment options are scarce.


While conducting their research, the locals they met while conducting focus groups remarked that she has death, because breast cancer is often considered an automatic death sentence in these communities.


In the first experiment, the team used the tool on jars of ultrasound gel, which thermodynamically mimics human breast tissue, to determine whether it could successfully reach standard freezing temperatures to kill tissue and form consistent ice balls.


The research teams next steps include ensuring the device can consistently kill cancer tissue under the same heat conditions as human breast tissue.

Read the full story from Johns Hopkins University.

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